Choose your battles wisely…


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An elephant took a bath in a river and was walking on the road. When it neared a bridge, it saw a pig fully soaked in mud coming from the opposite direction. The elephant quietly moved to one side, allowed the dirty pig to pass and then continued its onward journey.

The unclean pig later spoke to its friends in arrogance, “See how big I am; even the elephant was afraid of me and moved to one side to let me pass”.

On hearing this, some elephants questioned their friend, the reason for its action. Was it out of fear?

The elephant smiled and replied, “I could have easily crushed the pig under my leg, but I was clean and the pig was very dirty. By crushing it, my leg will become dirty and I wanted to avoid it. Hence, I moved aside.”

_This story reveals :_
Realized souls will avoid contact with negativity not out of fear, but out of desire to keep away from impurity though they are strong enough to destroy the impurity.

You need not react to every opinion, every comment, or every situation.

Kick the drama and keep going ahead

Choose your battles wisely… Not everything deserves Ur time and attention.

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Rape Culture and how we men play a part in it 💯


I acknowledge every woman I meet on the street, or in an elevator, or in a stairway, or wherever, in a way that indicates she’s safe. I want her to feel just as comfortable as if I weren’t there. I accept that any woman I encounter in public doesn’t know me, and thus, all she sees is a man — one who is suddenly near her. I have to keep in mind her sense of space and that my presence might make her feel vulnerable. That’s the key factor — vulnerability.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t spend much of my life feeling vulnerable. I’ve come to learn that women spend most of their social lives with ever-present, unavoidable feelings of vulnerability. Stop and think about that. Imagine always feeling like you could be at risk, like you were living with glass skin.

As modern men we must seek out danger. We choose adventures and extreme sports in order to feel like we’re in jeopardy. We make games of our vulnerability. That’s how differently men see the world from women. (Obviously, stated with full acknowledgment that there’s a vibrant community of extreme athletes that are women, who regularly risk their safety as well. However, women don’t need to engage in adrenalin sports to feel at-risk.)

A woman must consider where she is going, what time of day it is, what time she will arrive at her destination and what time she will leave her destination, what day of the week is it, if she will be left alone at any point … the considerations go on and on because they are far more numerous than you or I can imagine. Honestly, I can’t conceive of having to think that much about what I need to do to protect myself at any given moment in my life. I relish the freedom of getting up and going, day or night, rain or shine, Westside or downtown. As men we can enjoy this particular extreme luxury of movement and freedom of choice. In order to understand rape culture, remember this is a freedom that at least half the population doesn’t enjoy.

Rape prevention is about the fact that a man must understand that saying “no” doesn’t mean “yes,” that when a woman is too drunk/drugged to respond that doesn’t mean “yes,” that being in a relationship doesn’t mean “yes.” Rather than focus on how women can avoid rape, or how rape culture makes an innocent man feel suspect, our focus should be: how do we, as men, stop rapes from occurring, and how do we dismantle the structures that dismiss it and change the attitudes that tolerate it?

Since you are a part of it, you ought to know what rape culture is.

Rape Culture is an environment in which rape is prevalent and in which sexual violence against women is normalized and excused in the media and popular culture. Rape culture is perpetuated through the use of misogynistic language, the objectification of women’s bodies, and the glamorization of sexual violence, thereby creating a society that disregards women’s rights and safety.

Now that you know what it is, what can you do about rape culture?

Avoid using language that objectifies or degrades women

If a friend says she has been raped, take her seriously and be supportive

Speak out if you hear someone else making an offensive joke or trivializing rape

Think critically about the media’s messages about women, men, relationships, and violence

Be respectful of others’ physical space even in casual situations

Always communicate with sexual partners and do not assume consent

Define your own manhood or womanhood. Do not let stereotypes shape your actions

It’s okay if you don’t do what you went to school for.


Guys, life starts with being happy with your situation. If you’re unhappy, you won’t have the energy to get through the day. If you don’t have energy, you won’t have any motivation. Doing things you like helps you be happy.

I’m not saying quit your day job and rush headless into your ideal situation. It won’t work.

Think things through then follow through. — Eddie Rickenbacker

Not everything you’re going to try is going to work, and that’s okay. What’s important is that you don’t get too comfortable and don’t try new things.

My friend says: “What’s the worst that can happen?”

That’s a very important question. A lot of times we’re scared of doing something for fear of making our situation worse. A lot of times, that’s all it is — fear. A lot of ideas are not as scary as they seem.

I used to be scared shitless of dying. It was probably my number one fear. I mean, there’s still so much left to do in this world and I’m aging faster than I wish I would. But this quote changed my perspective on that:

“It is not death a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.” — Marcus Aurelius

I was scared because “I didn’t do anything”. By that I mean that I was simply doing my 8–5 job and playing video games after work, looking forward to weekends.

What kind of life is that? Is that really what life is all about?

I bet you’re wondering the same too. Or maybe you’re one of the lucky ones who found their true purpose in life.

Nonetheless, the important thing lies in the quote above: “beginning to live”.

What does that mean?

It means something different for everyone.

For me, it meant doing things out of my comfort zone. It meant conquering all my fears. It meant learning as many skills as possible. And ultimately, it meant becoming the best version of myself, and do the same for people around me, whether online and in person.

Man’s opinion in a feminist dominated World


Well, it’s true that I, George Collins, could never understand what it’s like to be a woman raised in this country. I will never know what it’s like to be looked at continually, or judged for my appearances, to be thought of as something somewhat inferior that can’t do the same work, on and on and on. But what is absurd about the idea is that I, George Collins, can’t make the effort, the empathetic effort, to actually go and really try and understand the experience of the people very different from me.

And in understanding that, I’ve enriched myself, and I can actually create something, I can even write something that’s very interesting. That from my outside perspective, I could have some interesting insights and that by taking the effort to understand the experience of other people, I’ve not only enriched myself, but my work will be that much deeper.

So, whenever I try and write a story about someone in my blog—obviously they come from different cultures, different periods, different genders, different races—my whole goal is to try and feel what it’s like to have been them. I know I can’t get close enough. I know that there’s going to be some things that are somewhat inaccurate about it. But why shouldn’t that be the ideal that we have in culture? Why shouldn’t that be a good thing to actually try and understand as deeply as possible the experience of other people? And why does it have to be labeled as some sort of cultural appropriation or some form hidden oppression when in fact it has always been the ideal in culture, for instance, to sort of get inside the experience of other people? I think that’s a question worth examining.

Advertisers Versus consumers/Customers


Advertisers have to constantly innovate to break through the “tuning out” that consumers learned to do. Post-Stalin Soviet leaders were increasing challenged to maintain the illusion that their system was superior to the west.

The Flynn Effect is the increase in intelligence in each generation since the 1930s. One study estimated that population IQ increases about three points per decade; another study estimated that the average IQ in 1932 was 80, on the same scale that the average IQ in 1997 was 100, i.e., people gained twenty IQ points in two or three generations. Many explanations have been proposed for the Flynn Effect, including better schooling, nutrition, and fewer infectious diseases. I propose that the arms race between advertisers and consumers contributed to the Flynn Effect.

There’s never been another Hitler or Stalin in countries that have mass media. The great dictators unleashed mass media on populations unvaccinated against mass lying. Late twentieth-century dictators were stuck in remote, isolated countries. With the Internet and video, oppression will be even harder for future dictators. Just try to get a wi-fi connection in Havana or Pyongyang!

Meritocracy’s a False Believe


Meritocracy has become a leading social ideal. Politicians across the ideological spectrum continually return to the theme that the rewards of life — money, power, jobs, university admission — should be distributed according to skill and effort.

The most common metaphor is the ‘even playing field’ upon which players can rise to the position that fits their merit. Conceptually and morally, meritocracy is presented as the opposite of systems such as hereditary aristocracy, in which one’s social position is determined by the lottery of birth. Under meritocracy, wealth and advantage are merit’s rightful compensation, not the fortuitous windfall of external events.

Meritocracy is a false and not a very salutary belief. As with any ideology, part of its draw is that it justifies the status quo, explaining why people belong where they happen to be in the social order. It is a well-established psychological principle that people prefer to believe that the world is just.

Meritocracy offers flattery. Where success is determined by merit, each win can be viewed as a reflection of one’s own virtue and worth. Meritocracy is the most self-congratulatory of distribution principles. Its ideological alchemy transmutes property into praise, material inequality into personal superiority. It licenses the rich and powerful to view themselves as productive geniuses. While this effect is most spectacular among the elite, nearly any accomplishment can be viewed through meritocratic eyes. Graduating from high school, artistic success or simply having money can all be seen as evidence of talent and effort. By the same token, worldly failures become signs of personal defects, providing a reason why those at the bottom of the social hierarchy deserve to remain there.

This is why debates over the extent to which particular individuals are ‘self-made’ and over the effects of various forms of ‘privilege’ can get so hot-tempered. These arguments are not just about who gets to have what; it’s about how much ‘credit’ people can take for what they have, about what their successes allow them to believe about their inner qualities. That is why, under the assumption of meritocracy, the very notion that personal success is the result of ‘luck’ can be insulting. To acknowledge the influence of external factors seems to downplay or deny the existence of individual merit.

Despite the moral assurance and personal flattery that meritocracy offers to the successful, it ought to be abandoned both as a belief about how the world works and as a general social ideal. It’s false, and believing in it encourages selfishness, discrimination, and indifference to the plight of the unfortunate.

How entertainment is Becoming a Golden lie


A “golden lie” is a false belief that induces co-operative behavior and fosters communities. “Golden lies” can also induce emotions, including fear, anger, empathy, and inspiration, when nothing in our physical environment is threatening or inspiring us. We choose to believe “golden lies” because we derive benefits from these false beliefs.

Women are attracted to male entertainers, especially men who are gifted with language, acting, or music. Acting is deception, e.g., a poor man pretends to be a king. Music, poetry, and storytelling (literature) induce emotional experiences in listeners, even if there’s no physical reason to feel an emotion. Theater, novels, and movies are “golden lies” in which we suspend our disbelief to experience emotions. E.g., seeing a rainbow after surviving a storm lifts our spirits. Talking about seeing a rainbow after a storm can invoke the same emotions. Emotions can be especially strong when we experience them in a group, which makes a community stronger.

For our ancestors, music, poetry, and feasting were experienced in religious contexts, along with rules for men and women about mating. Today men take women on dates where they pay talented men (chefs, actors, musicians) to entertain but not mate with the women, and increase the women’s interest in mating with their dates.

The “Arms Race” Between the Individual and the Community

If the “arms race” of our prehistoric ancestors was between men and women, in the religious era the “arms race” was between the individual and the community. Stealing bread was the most common crime of the pre-modern era, as readers of Les Misérables know. If your children are starving, should you steal bread and risk harsh punishment? Or should you trust that invisible beings will feed your children if you don’t steal? Should an individual consume alcohol or go fishing on the Sabbath? And which gods should you worship? These were life-or-death questions, but today seem like minor issues.