Final thoughts on Sebastian Haffner’s memoir Defying Hitler

A fortnight ago,I changed my taste from self help books to biographies and my first read was Sebastian Haffner’s memoir Defying Hitler and I think that this examination of Sebastian Haffner’s memoir Defying Hitler demonstrates to us how a memoir by itself must not be used as a sole source of scholarly knowledge. Memoirs clearly have their share of strengths and weaknesses — more weaknesses, however, than strengths. First, in terms of their weaknesses, memoirs only represent a specific person, of a specific gender, of a specific social group, age, and location. Second, it is impossible to corroborate certain information, especially regarding the author’s agenda, to identify whether or not he or she is speaking the truth. Third, memoirs only contain people’s perspective of a particular period, which may or may not be accurate if put into a careful academic examination of the events. But in spite of these weaknesses, memoirs still serve a useful purpose, especially when it comes to the fact that the scholar could delve into the writer’s most intimate thoughts, feelings, and desires. Memoirs are a window to a person’s life; they are useful sources of microhistories. In any case, if memoirs were to be used by historians, they had to be aware of its strengths and weaknesses, and only by comparing many different memoirs and other sources of information together could one really determine the most accurate account of a historical event.

Bibliography

Haffner, Sebastian. Defying Hitler: A Memoir. Translated by Oliver Pretzel. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.